Content Curation: Scoop.it and Other Great Ways to Share

Content CurationWe’ve been talking about what content curation is, why you should be doing it, and how to set up your content curation machine. Today we’re going to wrap up the content curation discussion by talking about the best ways to share curated content with your audience.

If you’ve been following along, you should be curating content from at least 3 different sources by now – Twitter Search, Google Alerts, and an RSS Reader. Now that you have all of this great information, how do you get it to your audience?

Let’s look at three ways you can share.

Manual Sharing on Social Media Sites

Perhaps the most obvious option for sharing your curated content is to scroll through the results, copy the ones you like, and paste them into Hootsuite to send out to your various social media networks. This is doable, but suffers from disadvantages of being time consuming, not very organized, and having a limited reach.

As fast as all of the social media network feeds move, you will be lucky if a good percentage of your audience sees the valuable information you’ve found for them if you are simply tweeting it out, or sharing it on other networks.

This is not to say you shouldn’t use this method. Twitter especially is a place where people love to find good links. (In fact, you’re finding a lot there in your content curation!) But you shouldn’t rely on this method alone.

You can also share your curated content on your blog. In fact, some blogs are made up of nothing but curated content. I don’t recommend this, however, as your blog is your home. It’s your place to showcase who you are and to build your loyal tribe of followers. You don’t want to send people off to another person’s home when they’ve come to visit you.

If you do have a blog that has a content curation component, the mycurator plugin seems to be a valuable addition to your WordPress blog. (As a disclaimer, I don’t use it, but I have heard good things about it).

 Creating a Daily “Newspaper”

You’ve undoubtedly seen one (or several) of these. The most popular, it appears to me, is paper.li.

The idea is to gather all of the content you’ve curated across the web into a digital newspaper or magazine. You can then “publish” your newspaper daily by sharing it on your social media networks. This gives readers a chance to see everything you’ve got on your topic at one time in a newspaper format.

I like it because it’s less “hit and miss” than randomly posting an article here and there on different social media networks. This is especially true if you can build a following for your newspaper. It also keeps your curated content completely separate from your blog.

I’ve personally used paper.li, which I like, although daily is too often for me. Some other content curation tools I’ve seen and heard good things about are Storify, Flipboard (an iPad/iPhone/Android app), CurationSoft, Bundlr, and Themeefy.

Scoop.it for One Stop Sharing

My favorite tool for content curation and sharing is Scoop.it. I think of Scoop.it as the Pinterest of content curation. Rather than being a daily paper of new content, it’s more like a board where you can collect, display and share content you’ve curated. And, you don’t even have to go outside of Scoop.it to find this content, as it’s gathered in a stream right there for you. You then pick what you like to share on your “board.”

Each “board” you have in Scoop.it is called a “Topic.” You give your Topic a unique name. You can have up to 5 different Topics on the free version of  Scoop.it.

There are too many features to detail here (I’ll give you a video next week), but here are some things  I like the most about Scoop.it:

  • Scoop.it makes it easy to put all of your best sources for curating content in one place. In addition to choosing the keywords you want Scoop.it to search for relevant content, you can also specify twitter users, twitter lists, and blogs that you want to see in your stream of relevant content to curate.
  • Scoop.it allows you to organize the content on your Topic in any way you want. By default, the most recently curated article is at the top. You can reorder it as you like, and can force an article to stay at the top by simply clicking on a star below the article.
  • You can share your entire Topic, or any individual article you curate, right from Scoop.it. Each piece of content has Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest, StumbleUpon, and Tumblr sharing buttons right beneath the content.
  • Scoop.it has a great app you can install on your toolbar. It allows you to curate anything you find on any website, and adds a Scoop.it button to Twitter and YouTube so you can scoop directly from those sites to your Topic.
  • Google search engines index your Scoop.it topics!

Scoop.it really is for everyone. Obviously, the more you use it, the more it benefits you. But one of the things I like about it is that it doesn’t suffer if you don’t have time to spend there every day.

Finally . . .

As we wrap up this series on content curation, let me just say that I can’t stress enough the importance of content curation for those who want to be seen as an authority in your market. With all of the great tools out there today (and I’ve only touched on a fraction of them!), it’s easy enough for even those of us with limited time to do it.

While there is no “one stop shop” for content curation, if you combine Scoop.it with the Twitter and Google Alerts searches, and use your RSS Reader, you will have a powerful and effective content curation machine. And, you’ll be well on your way to becoming the go-to expert in the eyes of your audience.

If you have questions, I’d be happy to answer them in the comments below. I’d also love to hear your thoughts on other great ways to curate content.

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