5 Signs That You Just Might Not Be An Entrepreneur

As an entrepreneur, I sometimes forget that not everyone is – or should be – in the constant pursuit of building his or her dream into a bigger and better business.  I spent some time with a friend last week, and she reminded me that being an entrepreneur comes completely from the heart. My friend goes to work, does her assignments, comes home, complains about work, and goes on with the rest of her life. And she wouldn’t have it any other way. While it takes some of us several years to realize we were born to be entrepreneurs, I do believe it’s as completely ingrained in you as the color of your eyes. Unfortunately, not everyone who thinks they want to be an entrepreneur is born with it. Some people want the entrepreneur lifestyle, but they don’t have the entrepreneur heart. I’ve experienced a lot of these people. Either as colleagues, through networking, or by coaching them. And I’ve never seen any of them build the business they claim to want. Over the years, I’ve seen a lot of traits these “wanna-be” entrepreneurs have in common. To help identify whether you’ve got the entrepreneur heart, or rather you would ultimately be much happier keeping your job, I’m sharing with you five of the top signs that you just might not be an entrepreneur. 1.  You Want to Talk About Making Money, Not Serving People If you’re just interested in making money and don’t really care how you do it, you’re going to have a tough time making it as an entrepreneur. The first thing I always talk with...

Why Your Online Branding Should Include YOU

Your online branding is one of the first, and most important, decisions you need to make in your business. Deciding who you want to be online, however, can be a difficult task. When you begin your online business, your confidence is never 100%. Doubts inevitably creep in. Do you have what it takes to make your business profitable? And, even if you’re certain of your abilities, will you be able to influence the number of people you need to build a successful business? For a number of reasons, you may have decided that your online branding should not include you ~ neither your name, nor your face. In many cases this is an unfortunate decision. Branding *YOU* is the easiest way to show your unique greatness to the market. Also, people like to do business with people over companies. If you are the face of your online branding, rather than a logo or a company name, it’s therefore easier for you to appeal to your audience. The good news is, no matter how you’ve decided to do business, your online branding can still include you. If you are not doing business online as “you.com,” you are either doing business as a company, an affiliate, or through a direct sales company. Let’s look at how you can still brand you in each case. 1. Online Branding  for Companies Using a company name rather than your own name doesn’t mean you have to hide behind your company. I’ll show you two great examples. ME Marketing Services is a social media management company run by Mandy Edwards. Mandy uses a business name, but there’s no...

3 Reasons Klout, & Other Social Media Numbers, Matter to You

First let me admit that I hate Klout. It’s not so much for anything they did. I think it goes back to my years of high school, college and grad school when I was always defined by a number. And now here I am in a business that I love, where no one has ever asked what my class rank was, and along comes Klout. And they’re wanting to rank me again. If your business or job has anything to do with social media and being online, your grade point average and class rank are quickly being replaced on your resume with your Klout, Kred, PeerIndex and PROskore scores. (There are others, but those seem to be the top ones, with Klout being the most popular). I didn’t like the numbers in school because I didn’t believe in them as accurate predictors of success. But, I had to live with them. The top companies only interviewed the top third of my class. If you weren’t there, you couldn’t even get your foot in the door. My complaint with the social media numbers today is similar. I question their accuracy in assessing a person’s value to the online world. I am especially troubled by Klout because your score there seems to be arrived at by a super-secret formula that they’d tell you, but then have to kill you. I am slightly optimistic about the release of new “updated” Klout scores, which consider more factors in formulating your score.  Klout is also becoming more transparent about what those factors are, likely in an effort to address their competitor Kred, which holds...

The Social Media Numbers Game: Is Bigger Really Better?

In much of life you may be judged by the company you keep, but in social media, you are judged by the numbers you keep.  The more fans, followers, and friends you have, the more successful you are deemed to be in social media.  The more connections you have and circles you are in, the greater number of people you are presumably influencing. Makes sense, right? Well, maybe. Sometimes the Numbers Lie One of the problems with focusing on your social media numbers is sometimes the numbers lie. It’s always possible to manipulate the numbers game. In fact, if you’ve been engaged in social media for any length of time at all, you’ve likely seen it done. You can buy 1,000 “targeted” Facebook fans for about $100-$200. Non-targeted fans are much cheaper. You can get 5000 Twitter followers for next to nothing. But, there are so many problems with these “too good to be true” answers to the social media numbers game. First of all, you will almost always be amazed to find that the people offering you these great deals have a couple of hundred fans/followers, at most. Which means they aren’t going to deliver you what they’ve promised either. Second, even if the promise is fulfilled, the engagement level of these new folks – yes, even the targeted ones – is going to be little to nothing. The payment is merely for following. You’ll be lucky if even a few of these new followers ever see your posts in their stream or news feed. People who are a fan of buying Facebook fans like to argue that no one will “Like”...

Procter and Gamble’s Olympic Lessons in Online Branding

If you watched even a moment of the 2012 Summer Olympics, you were undoubtedly exposed to the Procter and Gamble “Thank You, Mom” campaign. It was all over, to say the least. Even as a single mom, my first thought upon seeing that the company had branded itself as the “Proud sponsor of Moms” was “what about dad?” It became quickly apparent to me that dad had no place in the “Thank You, Mom” campaign. If this offended me (and it did), I wondered how it must be effecting families made up of a mom and dad? And how about those single dads out there? I imagined widespread boycotts of Procter and Gamble products, apologies from the company for forgetting dad, and a general “flop” of the campaign. Obviously, I was in need of some online branding lessons, because I couldn’t have been more wrong. As I started to look around online for reactions to this bold campaign, what I saw was 95% positive. People were gushing about how “heartwarming” the commercials were, and how you couldn’t watch them without shedding a tear. And make no mistake about it, this campaign was all about moms. If you have any reservations about this, just check out the company’s popular Facebook and Twitter presence. The word “mom” or “moms” appears 5 times in the cover photo alone. The slogan “Proud Sponsor of Moms” says it all. This is a marketing campaign for moms. Twitter tells the same story: As you can see, the mom lovefest was popular. The Facebook Page gathered 769,758 likes. And 35,298 followed on Twitter. And again, the response...