Be Careful About What You Assume in Your Home Business

I missed my favorite class at the gym last week because I had a meeting.  When I returned to class this week, people asked me where I’d gone and assumed I’d been on vacation.  Unfortunately, it was far from vacation, but it was clear why they’d made this assumption.  I never miss class, and I returned with a much darker tan wearing a Jamaica t-shirt that I did get on vacation — about 10 years ago. This first got me thinking that it truly is time to take a vacation.  But it also made me think about how we go through so much of life on assumptions and first impressions.  We don’t even consciously think about things.  We just go through the rhythm of life. Of course assuming someone’s been on vacation when they haven’t is pretty meaningless.  But as we work on self improvement and struggle to develop a consistent cash flow in our home business, forgetting to step outside the box of what’s expected can be fatal. Let’s face it, the assumption when you start a work from home business is that you are going to fail.  Your family expects it.  Your friends expect it.  And really, who can blame them?  They don’t predict your failure because they have no faith in you.  But because in truth, most people do fail in their home business efforts. And sadly, whether you want to admit it or not, at least a part of you assumes your business will fail.  I remember being in line to get in the doors of a network marketing company seminar I was attending.  Everyone...

What Do Toddlers Know About Self Improvement?

I’ve been working hard on a new project lately.  It’s left me a little overwhelmed and without much time for blogging (sadly).  But, it’s going well and I should be back to “normal,” if there is such a thing, within a couple of weeks. I was standing in the kitchen the other morning, feeling overwhelmed and a little stressed about all the work I had to do and the lack of any thought about what I might fix for dinner. In hopped my 2 year old, sporting only his morning diaper.  He had a big smile on his face as he bounced on both feet around the kitchen floor, babbling something I couldn’t decipher. He was totally immersed in himself.  He wasn’t playing with anything or interacting with anyone.  He was just happy. And I wanted so bad to know what was going on in his little head.  I imagined that he was deliriously happy to greet another beautiful day full of so much potential.  I wanted to think I was at least partially responsible for making his life such a happy one. But more than anything, I wanted to be him.  I wanted to happily hop around the kitchen floor with him.  I wanted his joy. And it made me think about what age we are when it becomes not okay to outwardly express our happiness like that.  Or better yet, when do we cease to be that happy?  And why? I know the short answer.  Toddlers can be so happy because they have no responsibility, nothing to worry about.  Everything’s taken care of for them. But I’m...